Sulje

Sulje

EDIT is a journal founded in 2014, focusing on contemporary art, artists, exhibitions and current cultural phenomena.

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Nayab Ikram is a Turku-based artist working in many collaborative ways. One of her latest projects is currently on show in Titanik. FemF ART 2019: How to Slow Rush is a group exhibition curated by Ikram and Ramina Habibollah. EDIT discussed with Ikram about exploring her own artistic practice, facilitating other artists as a curator and working towards a more inclusive and equal art field. What came up was sharing resources, involving diverse talents and taking care of relaxation, among other things.

Nayab Ikram is a Turku-based artist working in many collaborative ways. One of her latest projects is currently on show in Titanik. FemF ART 2019: How to Slow Rush is a group exhibition curated by Ikram and Ramina Habibollah. EDIT discussed with Ikram about exploring her own artistic practice, facilitating other artists as a curator and working towards a more inclusive and equal art field. What came up was sharing resources, involving diverse talents and taking care of relaxation, among other things.

Nayab Ikram is a Turku-based artist working in many collaborative ways. One of her latest projects is currently on show in Titanik. FemF ART 2019: How to Slow Rush is a group exhibition curated by Ikram and Ramina Habibollah. EDIT discussed with Ikram about exploring her own artistic practice, facilitating other artists as a curator and working towards a more inclusive and equal art field. What came up was sharing resources, involving diverse talents and taking care of relaxation, among other things.

Nayab Ikram is a Turku-based artist working in many collaborative ways. One of her latest projects is currently on show in Titanik. FemF ART 2019: How to Slow Rush is a group exhibition curated by Ikram and Ramina Habibollah. EDIT discussed with Ikram about exploring her own artistic practice, facilitating other artists as a curator and working towards a more inclusive and equal art field. What came up was sharing resources, involving diverse talents and taking care of relaxation, among other things.

How to Slow Rush – In conversation with Nayab Ikram

Kritiikin anatomia (”The Anatomy of Critique”) is a series of articles, that ponder on the essence of critique, the role of a critic and writing – what does writing a critique actually take and what kind of anatomy does a good critique have?
Series consists of texts that reflect upon the current discussions of critique and also my own writing. In addition I interview different writers and artists. The emphasis in this series is on the possibilities of critique rather than its so called crisis. This time I interviewed critic, editor-in-charge of KUNST.EE and art historian Andreas Trossek.

Kritiikin anatomia (”The Anatomy of Critique”) is a series of articles, that ponder on the essence of critique, the role of a critic and writing – what does writing a critique actually take and what kind of anatomy does a good critique have?
Series consists of texts that reflect upon the current discussions of critique and also my own writing. In addition I interview different writers and artists. The emphasis in this series is on the possibilities of critique rather than its so called crisis. This time I interviewed critic, editor-in-charge of KUNST.EE and art historian Andreas Trossek.

Kritiikin anatomia (”The Anatomy of Critique”) is a series of articles, that ponder on the essence of critique, the role of a critic and writing – what does writing a critique actually take and what kind of anatomy does a good critique have?
Series consists of texts that reflect upon the current discussions of critique and also my own writing. In addition I interview different writers and artists. The emphasis in this series is on the possibilities of critique rather than its so called crisis. This time I interviewed critic, editor-in-charge of KUNST.EE and art historian Andreas Trossek.

Kritiikin anatomia (”The Anatomy of Critique”) is a series of articles, that ponder on the essence of critique, the role of a critic and writing – what does writing a critique actually take and what kind of anatomy does a good critique have?
Series consists of texts that reflect upon the current discussions of critique and also my own writing. In addition I interview different writers and artists. The emphasis in this series is on the possibilities of critique rather than its so called crisis. This time I interviewed critic, editor-in-charge of KUNST.EE and art historian Andreas Trossek.

Kritiikin anatomia: Interview with Andreas Trossek

This marks the launch of EDIT’s new series of curated texts from writers outside its own editorial team. This continuing series will cover diverse topics from various authors and will from here on be known as Kutsuvieras. The first article features a discussion between writer Jenna Jauhiainen and Barbara Vanderlinden, former professor at the University of The Arts in Helsinki.

This marks the launch of EDIT’s new series of curated texts from writers outside its own editorial team. This continuing series will cover diverse topics from various authors and will from here on be known as Kutsuvieras. The first article features a discussion between writer Jenna Jauhiainen and Barbara Vanderlinden, former professor at the University of The Arts in Helsinki.

This marks the launch of EDIT’s new series of curated texts from writers outside its own editorial team. This continuing series will cover diverse topics from various authors and will from here on be known as Kutsuvieras. The first article features a discussion between writer Jenna Jauhiainen and Barbara Vanderlinden, former professor at the University of The Arts in Helsinki.

This marks the launch of EDIT’s new series of curated texts from writers outside its own editorial team. This continuing series will cover diverse topics from various authors and will from here on be known as Kutsuvieras. The first article features a discussion between writer Jenna Jauhiainen and Barbara Vanderlinden, former professor at the University of The Arts in Helsinki.

Curating For a Brighter Future: Interview with Barbara Vanderlinden

As we were beginning to shoot that day, she asked me about my personal ways of recollecting lost thoughts – if there were any mental or cognitive tools I used to regain lost memories and ideas. I said that I’d noticed developing a certain slip of thought: thinking a thought and then randomly transitioning to a stream of new ideas and not remembering the initial thought at all. Through this I had also formulated a practice of taking steps backwards along my thought patterns. This would eventually lead to my first thought by default. Acts of Remembrance is a piece about the interplay of sensation and memory, the sense of touch in particular in relation to (and a tool of) remembering.

As we were beginning to shoot that day, she asked me about my personal ways of recollecting lost thoughts – if there were any mental or cognitive tools I used to regain lost memories and ideas. I said that I’d noticed developing a certain slip of thought: thinking a thought and then randomly transitioning to a stream of new ideas and not remembering the initial thought at all. Through this I had also formulated a practice of taking steps backwards along my thought patterns. This would eventually lead to my first thought by default. Acts of Remembrance is a piece about the interplay of sensation and memory, the sense of touch in particular in relation to (and a tool of) remembering.

As we were beginning to shoot that day, she asked me about my personal ways of recollecting lost thoughts – if there were any mental or cognitive tools I used to regain lost memories and ideas. I said that I’d noticed developing a certain slip of thought: thinking a thought and then randomly transitioning to a stream of new ideas and not remembering the initial thought at all. Through this I had also formulated a practice of taking steps backwards along my thought patterns. This would eventually lead to my first thought by default. Acts of Remembrance is a piece about the interplay of sensation and memory, the sense of touch in particular in relation to (and a tool of) remembering.

As we were beginning to shoot that day, she asked me about my personal ways of recollecting lost thoughts – if there were any mental or cognitive tools I used to regain lost memories and ideas. I said that I’d noticed developing a certain slip of thought: thinking a thought and then randomly transitioning to a stream of new ideas and not remembering the initial thought at all. Through this I had also formulated a practice of taking steps backwards along my thought patterns. This would eventually lead to my first thought by default. Acts of Remembrance is a piece about the interplay of sensation and memory, the sense of touch in particular in relation to (and a tool of) remembering.

Acts of Remembrance